SET LISTS

 

An overview of the songs played in Steve Marriott’s live performances

 

by Iain McGonigal

 

 

 

Pre-Small Faces

Are you sitting comftybold?

Then we'll begin.

Unfortunately, nowadays there aren't any records of setlists from Steve's pre-Small Faces years. However, Steve played hundreds of gigs, particularly in 1964 with the Moments. The Moments were big enough to actually have their own fanzine published. They gigged up and down the country, playing such illustrious venues as the 100 Club in Oxford Street, the Ilford Palais, and Leeds University (to be made famous in the future with the Who's Live at Leeds record.  They also supported a real who's who of the current music scene, including John Mayall, Mose Allison, The Action, Zoot Money, Georgie Fame, Gene Vincent, The Animals, the Nashville Teens and The Graham Bond organisation.

The Moments' repertiore was largely based on Beatles and Rolling Stones covers. In general, prior to the Small Faces, Steve Marriott's live sets were said to consist also of Rufus Thomas numbers, and the Shadows, James Brown, Muddy Waters, Bo DIddley, Chuck Berry, Little Richard and Shane Fenton.

While the Moments represented the pinnacle of Steve's pre-Small Faces career....remember - he had a recording contract as a solo artist at the age of 16 - and even as Steve Marriott and the Frantics they toured extensively around the country - not just in London

A likely pre-Small Faces setlist would be something along the following lines - all are songs that Steve was KNOWN to play live at the time

Anna (go to him)
Cut Across Shorty
House of the Rising Sun
Please Please Please
I Saw her Standing There
I'm a Hog for You, Baby
Love Potion No 9
Night Train
Ooh Poo Pa Doo
Route 66
Talking 'Bout You (Chuck Berry)
Twist and Shout (boyfriend/girlfriend song with Adrienne Posta)
I'm on Fire (Jerry Lee Lewis)
I Don't Mind (James Brown)
Zip a Dee Doo Dah
Too Much Monkey Business

I believe that Think and You Need Loving would be in there too, as well as some self-penned songs one called A Touch of Blues and one called Sheila my Dear.


1965

The Small Faces got off to the fastest of starts in this whirlwind year. After some weeks of rehearsals they were playing their first gig in May - still without a name - and less than three months later their first single was written, recorded, released and making its journey up the UK charts. In fact they recorded it about six weeks after their first gig! The Small Faces then really started to earn their spurs as a group by constant touring throughout the rest of the year. The 1965 Small Faces gigs were based around the following cover songs.

Whatcha Gonna Do About It
Jump Back
Think
Stand By Me
Baby What You Want Me to Do (Jimmy Reed)
What's a Matter Baby
Baby Don't Do It
Please Please Please

Again, I think it's very likely that Shake and You Need Loving were also included, and also Night Train.

Essentially, their set was stetched out versions of classic RnB songs.


1966

This was the year in which the Small Faces started to really develop their live act musically, and also  when they started to get into problems with the kids screaming at their concerts. I've included below an example of a 1H66 and 2H66 live set.  The Small Faces debut at the Marquee in March 1966 gives a good indication of their stage set at that time, including the following:

Shake
You Need Loving
Come On Children
Baby Please Don't Go
E too D
Plum Nellie

They were raw, powerful and full of energy - attracting a crowd similar to themselves in age. The teenyboppers were still to come.  During this time, they were almost certainly also featuring Sha La La La Lee, Whatcha Gonna Do About It and Coming Home, and Baby (a Mel Torme song). At least once, they played live Good Lovin' by the Young Rascals.

In the second half of 1966, their Scandanavian tour in November, saw the Small Faces stretch out, and they sounded uncannily like Steve would sound at the Fillmore East a few years down the line - very heavy,  long jams,  soulful ad libs and harmonica breaks.

I Feel Alright
Whatcha Gonna Do About It
Shake
Plum Nellie
You've Really Got a Hold of Me
All or Nothing


1967

This is a difficult year to track the Small Faces setlists. They concentrated on studio work - their Manager owned a Record Company,  whereas Don Arden got his money largely from live appearances of the group.  The screaming was also at its height, and the problem for the Small Faces was that their first Immediate album shows where they were at musically when they jammed in the studio they felt they were like a real rhythm and blues group - like Zoot Money, but live they felt they were obliged to play their hit singles.

During the summer months, the group definitely experimented with Paperback Writer, but their live act was based around the following:

Whatcha Gonna Do ABout It
Hey Girl
Sha La La La Lee
All or Nothing
I Can't Make It
Shake
You Need Loving

Although they may have been played, I've no record of their 1967 singles being played live, ie Here Comes the Nice, Tin Soldier and Itchycoo Park.  In the case of the latter, because they had no way to reproduce the phasing sounds on a live stage.


1968

Very early in the year saw an infamous tour of Australia and New Zealand, with the Who. The Small Faces live set for the tour was pretty much as follows:

Sha La La La Lee
Get Ready
All or Nothing
Itchycoo Park
Every little Bit Hurts
If I Were a Carpenter
Tin Soldier

This was a noticeable change from the 1967 set - with All or Nothing being the only common link.

In late 1968 in the UK, way after the release of Ogdens Nutgone Flake, the set was as follows:

Rollin Over
Wham Bam Thankyou Mam
All or Nothing
Tin Soldier
Every Little Bit Hurts
If I were a Carpenter
The Universal


1969

The last ever Small Faces concerts were during a European tour in early 1969, after Steve had given notice he was leaving the band. And so this classic band bowed out with the following setlist:

You Need Loving
Every Little Bit Hurts
Song of a Baker
Long Black Veil
Every Little Bit Hurts
Tin Soldier
All or Nothing

As far as Humble Pie are concerned, 1969 represents a really formative year in their live set - although from the very beginning

some songs appeared which would consistently form an integral part of their show for many years to come, while others like We Can Talk and Chest Fever barely got off the ground. I've included quite a number of examples from this very fertile period.

BBC - August

Natural Born Bugie
Sad Bag of Shakey Jake
Heartbeat
Desperation

Ronnie Scott's Club (the next day, and their first formal live gig)

Sad Bag of Shakey Jake
I Walk on Guilded Splinters
Desperation
Heartbeat

Paradiso, Amsterdam later in August

Sad Bag of Shakey Jake
I Walk on Guilded Splinters
Desperation
Hallelujah I Love Her So
Wrist Job

Blitzen Festival in Belgium a couple days later

Wrist Job
Sad Bag of Shakey Jake
I Walk on Guilded Splinters

Whiskey a Go Go in October

For Your Love
Shakin All Over
Hallelujah I Love Her So
Sad Bag of Shakey Jake
I Walk on Guilded Splinters

Fillmore East in November

Take Me Back
Shakin All Over

So you can see the evolution, and the search for direction - yet none of this documents the UK Changes '69 tour which saw them play Take Ma Back, Cold Lady, I Worship the Ground and For Your Love.


1970

This year was a turning point in Humble Pie's live set, from the experimentation and promise of 1969, towards the set that would become immortalised in 1971 by Rocking the Fillmore. The change happened around end June.  Up until then, Humble Pie had been playing a show which was transitional, but still owed plenty to their 1969 setlist. For example, in early June at the London Marquee, the set was...

For Your Love
I Walk on Guilded Splinters
One Eyed Trouser Snake Rumba
I'm Ready
Hallalujah I Love Her So
Only a Roach
Sad Bag of Shakey Jake

Barely two months later, here's what they played in Amsterdam...

Four Day Creep
I'm Ready
Hallelujah I Love Her So
I Don't Need No Doctor
I Walk on Guilded Splinters

Does this sound familiar ?

By September, when they played John Peel television show "Sounds of the Seventies", this live set was supplemented by plugs for their A&M album material.

Four Day Creep
I'm Ready
Live With Me
Stone Cold Fever
Hallelujah I Love Her So
I Walk on Guilded Splinters
Sad Bag of Shakey Jake
One Eyed Trouser Snake Rhumba
Big Black Dog


1971

The year that produced the best live album of all time (if you don't count King Biscuit in 1973) and also produced Rock On. Not a bad legacy!

In March at the BBC, there was the following set:

Four Day Creep
I'm Ready
I Don't Need No Doctor
Rolling Stone
The Light

By the Philadeplphia Spectrum in April, though, it was now the Fillmore Set...

Four Day Creep
I'm Ready
I Walk on Guilded Splinters
Halelujah I Love Her So
Rolling Stone

Then, Rocking the Fillmore itself was recorded over two nights in May...

Four Day Creep
I'm Ready
Stone Cold Fever
I Walk on Guilded Splinters
Rolling Stone
Hallelujah I Love Her So
I Don't Need No Doctor

However, before this album was even released, Frampton was gone - and before we had time to blink the new Humble Pie with Clem Clempson were playing the following set in New York on New Year's Eve -  not a set to promote the Fillmore album - but a set which was already deep into Smokin territory.

Four Day Creep
C'Mon Everybody
The Fixer
I Wonder
Sweet Peace and Time
Hallelujah I Love Her So
Rolling Stone
I Don't Need No Doctor

Pretty fast transition, eh?


1972

Another classic year!  In the first half of the year the set above from New York was pretty much the standard fare, but by August, at the outdoor show at Gaelic Park in the Bronx, they had started to mutate into the show that would be taped for the 4th side of Eat It.

Up Our Sleeve
C'Mon Everybody
Honky Tonk Woman
I Wonder
Hallelujah I Love Her So
I Don't Need No Doctor
Hot n Nasty
Four Day Creep
Rolling Stone

On to the show at Glasgow Green's Playhouse in November which became the actual 4th Side of Eat It.

Up Our Sleeve
C'Mon Everybody
Honky Tonk Woman
I Wonder
Hallelujah I Love Her So
I Don't Need No Doctor
Hot n Nasty
Roadrunner

Now, I don't know what they did with the tapes afterwards. I know they sound "screechy" and less than vital, but as one who was there in person that night, let me assure you that in the venue the sound was a clear as a bell. Pie were mesmerising - both visually and aurally. Don't ask me what translated onto vinyl, but it was a truly fabulous show.


1973

Question: How do you follow a classic year ?

Answer: With the best live gigs in the history of rock !

By early 1973, the set which became immortalised by the King Biscuit release was taking shape.  In Boston, in April, it was getting there...

Up our Sleeve
Four Day Creep
C'Mon Everybody
Honky Tonk Woman
I Believe to My Soul
30 Days in the Hole
Roadrunner
I Wonder
Hallelujah I Love Her So
I Don't Need No Doctor
Hot n Nasty
Twist and Shout

This epic set remained pretty much the same throughout the year, including the UK Tour in the Autumn. I Wonder dropped out and Oh La De Da was added, but apart from that no real change.  This was Pie at the absolute top of their game !


1974

This year presented a dilemma to the Pie. Gone were the Blackberries, and much of the glitz of their 1973 stageshow. The set was pretty much back to basics. They did have a new album (Thunderbox) to promote, which represented a funkier direction - but the crowds expected the old Humble Pie, and at this point some disillusionment with the music they were playing did set in.

Also, it was becoming clear that despite the ravages of too many US tours on Steve's voice and on the group in general, the money wasn't forthcoming. This was the beginning of the end.

When I saw Humble Pie live in 1974, they were still the guvnors. But it was also obvious that something had changed.  Many high points remain though, including rattling the Who at Charlton with a set that included the following:

Whatcha Gonna Do About It (first outing since the Small Faces days)
Thunderbox
I Don't Need No Doctor
C'Mon Everybody

By the middle of the year, when they played the Rainbow Theatre in June, their set was...

Whatcha Gonna Do ABout It
Thunderbox
Sweet Peace and Time
Let Me Be Your Lovemaker
C'Mon Everybody
30 Days in the Hole

This set continued through the end of the year. In fact, the standard Pie fare on the European Tour at the end of 1974 was

Thunderbox
Four Day Creep
Sweet Peace and Time
The Fixer
30 Days in the Hole
Let Me Be Your Love maker
C'Mon Everybody
I Don't Need No Doctor

...full of the hardest hitting, heaviest classics. Leaning back on the Smokin album to a large extent


1975

The farewell tour. The last ever Humble Pie concerts (at least with this classic line-up).

15 February New York City

Four Day Creep
Stone Cold Fever
C'Mon Everybody
30 Days in the Hole
I Wonder
Hallelujah I Love Her So
Sweet peace and Time
The Fixer
I Don't Need No Doctor
Honky Tonk Woman
Thunderbox

4 songs from Fillmore, 5 songs from Smoking and one each from Eat It and Thunderbox.  Farewell Humble Pie!


Later in 1975, Steve took a job touring as Alexis Korner's guitar player.  In the CD and the video shot from German television, the following superb set is featured:

One Whiskey, One Bourbon, One Beer (from the Snape album Accidently Born in New Orleans, with which Steve was heaviliy associated)
Slowdown (later a Marriott stage standard)
Diamonds in the Rough ( a must have. Steve at his best )
Get Off My Cloud (from Korner's album of the same name)
I Saw the Light (the Hank Williams in Marriott pours out....not for the first time - in fact Steve's first musical hero)


1976

This was the year where Steve set out with his Allstars. The following set was played at his first concert in the US with the new line-up.
Despite the promise shown, and a very good show, within a month, the Allstars were disbanded, never to play together again.

I'm Ready (done a la Muddy Waters not a la Humble Pie)
Looking for Love
Late Night Lady
Louisiana (Song of the South)
East Side Strutting
You Don't Know Me
Star in My Life
Hallelujah I Love Her So



1977

The reformed Small Faces. Their 1977 sets centred around the following format:

Whatcha Gonna Do About It
Everybody Needs Somebody to Love
High and Happy
All or Nothing
Find It
Itchycoo Park
Smiling in Tune
Tin Soldier
Playmates
Looking for Love
Lazy Sunday

Later they included Jimmy McCullough in the line-up and some additional live songs such as Bob Seger's Fire Down Below. The Small Faces comeback had been hyped up by the Music Press, and the audience was meanwhile disappearing towards the New Wave acts. Basically, they didn't sell well enough.


1978 - 1979

This represents a "lost" period for live Steve Marriott for a couple of years. Gigging was at times sporadic, and certainly away from the public gaze. By the time the Small Faces second album "78 in the Shade" was released in August 1978 the group were already, to all intents and purposes, history. A solo Steve Marriott show at the Bridgehouse Pub in London pointed more towards a future Packet of Three career than anything else. He was billed as Matt Vinyl, and had Dave Hynes, Jim Leverton and Micky Finn in his band.

Steve sat in on organ for an opening instrumental of Memphis. They covered a few Humble Pie numbers, including (unusually) Grooving with Jesus - retitled to Boozing with Jesus. But the set centred on US RnB covers!

Tax reasons soon had Steve having to relocate to the USA, where he made his home base in the Santa Cruz mountains. In this time, of some of the worst financial hardship he ever suffered, Steve tried to get The Firm off the ground with Leslie West and also formed the Steve Marriott Deluxe Band.

Irrespective of the story about writing and recording Fool For a Pretty Face over the course of a weekend at the start of the Humble Pie reunion - in fact Fool For a Pretty Face was debuted live during the Santa Cruz period.  Both of the above bands played live, but the setlists are not known.

What is known is a collection of songs that Steve was working with at the time, and which no doubt featured heavily in his live set...

All Shook Up
Back To You
Big Train Stops in Memphis
Fool For a Pretty Face
Infatuation
Kiss Him Goodbye
Midnight Rollin
Wass Name
You Don't Own Me


1980

As Humble Pie reformed, they played support mainly on a number of US tours.
The standard (shortened) set of the time was the following:

I Don't Need No Doctor
Infatuation
Drum Solo
Thirty Days in the Hole
Fool for a Pretty Face
Knock on Wood


1981

By now, the 1980 set had been augmented with Tin Soldier, and normally with an encore of Route 66.  By mid-year, towards the end of Humble Pie's time together the following set had emerged pretty consistently...

I Don't Need No Doctor
Infatuation
All Shook Up
Thirty Days in the Hole
Hallelujah I Love Her So
I Walk on Guilded Splinters
Fool For a Pretty Face
Route 66
Tulsa Time
Tin Soldier

A setlist full of the kind of Humble Pie music that the US circuit demanded. But the momentum that had been building was stalled by a lack of promotion and therefore poor sales of the excellent Go For the Throat album which was released in May.   Worse - Pie's comeback gig at the Rainbow in London, scheduled for the end of July, had to be cancelled when Steve was hospitalised with a split duodenal tract. There was no money coming in to sustain the group, so instead he found himself treading the boards with Ronnie Lane at the Bridgehouse on the 1st September, with a completely different set of songs, including Whatcha Gonna Do About It, All or Nothing, Tin Soldier and I Can't Stand the Rain.


1982

This represents the second "lost" period.  Steve was based in Atlanta around this time, and in fact had put together a very hot band.
 
His sound engineer at the time was Gary Hays, who has gone into his files and has produced the setlist below for the Agora Ballroom in Atlanta in July 1982, which he confirms was the same for pretty much all of the tour
 
Fool for a Pretty Face
Whatcha Gonna Do About It
Payback
Tulsa Time
Tin Soldier
Walk on Gilded Splinters
Five Long Years/Drum Solo/Thirty Days in the Hole
I Don't Need No Doctor
 
The band was Steve, Jimmy Leverton, Goldy McJohn, & Fallon Williams.
 
Interestingly, Gary suggests that it was 40 minutes and end of show - no encore.


1983

One of the best touring bands Steve ever had - with Tommy Johnson, later Phil Dix on guitar, Keith Christopher on bass and Fallon Williams on drums. The standard set would be along the following lines:

Whatcha Gonna Do About It
Fool For a Pretty Face
Hallelujah I Love Her So
Five Long Years
The Fixer
Thirty Days in the Hole
I Don't Need No Doctor
Big Trains Stops at Memphis
Walking the Dog

Once again liberally sprinkled with Humble Pie classics for the US audience - but introducing for the first time songs like Five Long Years, which would become the centrepiece of the Packet of Three set.



1984

The year of Packet of Three....backed initially by the Lillettes (Vicky Brown and Sam Brown).

A gig in March 1984 in Steve's old stomping ground Manor Park illustrates the way things were going...

Whatcha Gonna Do About It
Fool For a Pretty Face
Shame, Shame, Shame
Walking the Dog
All or Nothing
Maybe Baby
Do Right Woman, Do Right Man
When Will I Be Loved
All Shook Up
Thirty Days in the Hole

By midyear, the set had settled down to much more standard fare as immortalised on Dingwalls. And by the end of the year (Mead Fiddler in November) Steve was still largely following the Dingwalls set...

Whatcha Gonna Do About It
Fool For a Pretty Face
Cockney Rhyme
Shame, Shame, Shame
The Fixer
All Shook Up
All or Nothing
Five Long Years
Drum Solo
Thirty Days in the Hole
I Don't Need No Doctor
Big Train Stops at Memphis
Walking the Dog
Tin Soldier


1985

By now, the Packet of Three recipe was set, and there wasn't much need for too much tinkering.  The US tour early in the year continued with pretty much the end 1984 setlist. Being America, the only fine tuning would be dropping All or Nothing and adding one new song Hungry, which appeared on some of the dates. From mid-year onwards, the UK stageshow had Small Faces numbers like Afterglow and All or Nothing added, to the exclusions on Humble Pie standards like Thirty Days in the Hole and The Fixer. The running order on the George Robey CD release gives a good indication of this time.

Whatcha Gonan Do About It
Fool For a Pretty Face
Shame, Shame, Shame
All or Nothing
All Shook Up
Talking 'Bout You
Five Long Years
Afterglow
I Don't Need No Doctor
Tin Soldier



1986

Another year and still not too much change evident - albeit a big change was just around the corner.  In touring Canada, for example, in late 1986, only All Shook Up had been dropped from the 1985 set - with a few familiar  numbers thrown in to lengthen the headliners set...

Whatcha Gonna Do About It
Fool For a Pretty Face
Shame, Shame, Shame
All or Nothing
Talking 'Bout You
Five Long Years
Hallelujah I Love Her So
(Don't You Lie to Me) sometimes
Afterglow
I Don't Need No Doctor
Thirty Days in the Hole
Mr Pitiful
Big Train Stops at Memphis
Walking the Dog
Tin Soldier


1987

Time for a new band, and an augemented sound. Steve introduced a Hammond player (the top notch Wynder K Frog) into the band, and also gave himself a chance to lay off the guitar from time to time and concentrate on singing and some harmonica playing. People who saw this line-up rate it as one of the very best. The set changed out of all recognition too - and offstage Steve was producing some of the loveliest studio tracks never to see the light of day.

Ladies and Gentlemen, Steve Marriott and the Official Receivers.

February in Edinburgh went like this...

Some Kind of Wonderful
Don't You Lie to Me
Mother-in-law
All or Nothing
You Don't Love Me No More
Talking 'Bout You
I Never Loved a Woman
Whatcha Gonna Do About It
Fool For a Pretty Face
Five Long Years
Tin Soldier
Run Run Rudolph

The setlist continued fairly consistently throughout the year, with a few additions. I Never Loved a Woman and Whatcha Gonna Do About It made way for these new additions.

Towards the end of the year, and the end of the Official Receivers era, the set was based around the following:

Some Kind of Wonderful
Don't You Lie to Me
Mother-in-law
All or Nothing
Knocking on Your Door
My Girl
Talking 'Bout You
Fool For a Pretty Face
Five Long Years
I Don't Need No Doctor
Tin Soldier
Slowdown
Big Train Stops at Memphis
Run Run Rudolph


1988

Steve wouldn't stop raving about Midlands RnB outfit the DT's - and everwhere he played he'd recommend that they booked the DT's. Eventually his agent said "Steve, either shut up about them or go and join them !". And then there was Steve Marriott and the DT's! The group would go onstage and play a few numbers - and then Steve would come join them . Another red hot era. Maybe the hottest of all his post Humble Pie live work judging by available videos and CD's. Albeit the official release "Sing the Blues Live" is not anywhere near the best representation of their live work together.

Here's a sample of an early setlist from 4th March at the Red Lion - only three songs surviving the cut from the Official Receivers show...

Have a Good Time
Everything's Gonna Be Alright
Crosscut Saw
Watch Your Step
Let's Work Together
My Babe
World in a Jug
Before You Accuse Me
Walking the Dog
Don't You Lie to Me
I Don't Know Where I've Been
Five Long Years
Walking By Myself
All or Nothing
How Come People Act LIke That
High Heeled Sneakers

By later in the year - and the gig in Cologne on 7 September is a good example (featured in our Reviews section on this site) - the set was developing with a handful of different songs...

Have a Good Time
Everything's Gonna Be Alright
Promised Land
Cow Gun
Crosscut Saw
Watch Your Step
Let's Work Together
My Babe
World in a Jug
Before You Accuse Me
Don't You Lie to Me
I Don't Know Where I've Been
Five Long Years
Walking By Myself
All or Nothing
Just Your Fool
How Come People Act LIke That
High Heeled Sneakers


1989

The DT's lasted through until late July, firm friends offstage as well as dynamic onstage. But by then Steve Walwyn, though, had gotten the call to play for Dr Feelgood - and as a professional musician this was too big a chance to turn down. On the way back from some Scandanavian gigs, Steve was ready to move on to his "Next" project. The last DT's gigs had introduced Big Train Stops at Memphis into the songlist, always one of Steve's strongest live songs, but basically the songs were very similar to the 1988 set, albeit in a much different running order.

Watch Your Step
Let's Work Together
Everything's Gonna Be Alright
Don't You Lie to Me
My Babe
World in a Jug
Before You Accuse Me
Big Train Stops at Memphis
I Don't Know Where I've Been
Five Long Years
All or Nothing
Promised Land
Just Your Fool
High Heeled Sneakers
This Old Fool


The Next Band puzzle some people, but to me it was a wonderful combination of all that was best in Steve's career up to that point. Some Faces, some Pie, some Packet of Three, and throw in the highlights of the Official Receivers and DT's as well! To Steve, he thought of it a little bit the same way. He said "Uncle Jim'll sing a few songs, Si will do his thing, Kofi will get his chance to shine and I'll do a few numbers"

And for those who were puzzled why Steve brought a harmonica player into the band - well watch Simon Hickling live and you know exactly why!

Newcastle is a good example of the Next band's setlist, which was the following:

Watch Your Step
Some Kind of Wonderful
Fool for a Pretty Face
Everything's Gonna Be Alright
Knocking on Your Door
This Old Fool
Big Train Stops at Memphis
Whatcha Gonna Do About It
I Don't Know Where I've Been
Natural Born Bugie
My Babe
Five Long Years
All or Nothing
Tin Soldier
Thirty Days in the Hole
Just Your Fool


1990

The Next Band continued through May - though when Simon Hickling deputised in Nine Below Zero, Steve reverted to a trio, and Packet of Three was reborn. For the first few months of the year - the Next Band set was played as per 1989, and became the only Steve Marriott band incarnation that played the same set from their inception until their demise.


Watch Your Step
Some Kind of Wonderful
Fool for a Pretty Face
Everything's Gonna Be Alright
Knocking on Your Door
This Old Fool
Big Train Stops at Memphis
Whatcha Gonna Do About It
I Don't Know Where I've Been
Natural Born Bugie
My Babe
Five Long Years
All or Nothing
Tin Soldier
Thirty Days in the Hole
Just Your Fool

The Packet of Three set built on the Next Band's idea of a kind of "best of" of Steve's live career. Out went the Simon Hickling specialities like Everything's Gonna Be Alright and I Don't Know Where I've Been, and in came Itchycoo Park and Hallelujah I Love Her So.

The gig at the Wheatsheaf in Stoke on 23 June illustrates this...

Watch Your Step
Some Kind of Wonderful
Fool for a Pretty Face
Whatcha Gonna Do ABout It
Cockney Rhyme
Itchycoo Park
Mr Pitiful
Hallelujah I Love Her So
Natural Born Bugie
Five Long Years
Big Train Stops at Memphis
All or Nothing
Before You Accuse Me


1991

The tragic year of Steve's untimely death. Ironically, before he left for California and the re-union with Peter Frampton, in January 1991 Steve and the Packet were in the finest form on a Swiss-German tour.

The last setlists Steve would ever play were along these lines...

Memphis
Watch Your Step
Some Kind of Wonderful
Big Train Stops at Memphis
Whatcha Gonna Do About It
Talking 'Bout You
Cockney Rhyme
Itchycoo Park
Mr Pitiful
Hallelujah I Love Her So
Five Long Years
All or Nothing
This Old Fool
Natural Born Bugie
Before You Accuse Me

So there you have it!  I hope you've found this trawl through Steve Marriott gigs over the years interesting. A man who had to find an outlet -  a way to get the music out of his system. Also an absolute natural...one of our very best ever  British talents, and someone was was every bit at ease playing the pubs of England as he ever was playing Stadiums at his peak - maybe even more so.
And don't forget - at his peak, for a couple of years in the early 70's he was the best live performer in the world, bar none.

Ironic that in his last ever gigs he was playing songs like Talking 'Bout You, twenty seven years after regularly playing the same song with the Moments in 1964.  Still playing Hallelujah I Love Her So twenty two years after doing likewise at Humble Pie's first gigs, and playing Whatcha Gonna Do About It, which of course featured in the Small Faces first gigs.

Hats off to the old Tosser!  Thanks for the memories.  Thanks for some of the best nights ever!

 

 

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